HISTORY OF THE
GALVESTON UNITED METHODIST CHURCH


Galveston Methodists first worshipped in Sprinkle Chapel, a double-wide log cabin on a creek west of Galveston, in 1845. In 1873 a frame church costing $800 was erected, which was remodeled in 1899. This building was destroyed by fire in 1901 when much of the town of Galveston burned. A Gothic Revival church with a lofty spire was build on East Jackson Street in the same year, costing $4,345. Built with rolling doors that expanded seating capacity to 500, the building featured native stone and brick walls and a slate roof. Bedford stone was used for sills, trim, and steps. The building featured a furnace and gas lighting. In 1940 a kitchen, dining hall, and restrooms were finished in the basement added in 1906. 

In 1960 the congregation met in the local elementary school while the santuary was gutted and the chancel moved from north to east. New oak pews which seated 200 brought the cost to $20,000. Further changes took place when the United Brethren church windows were added to those already in the church upon a merger which took place on January 1, 1965. The Education Wing, at a cost of $124,070.62 was officially occupied on Easter Sunday of 1979. 

The Lincoln Methodist Church closed in 1984, many of the members transferred to Galveston, and in 1998 the Otterbein Church became part of Galveston UMC. 

On May 28, 1997, the church building was destroyed by fire. Services were held at the Galveston Elementary School, while the new church building was constructed. 

On July 11, 1999, we celebrated our first service in the new church building, located at 515 S. Maple Street. Official dedication was August 28, 1999 with, the Indiana Bishop, Woodie White officiating.

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